Droplets

Using Command Line tools is not very intuitive. You have to know a minimum of DOS language to survive.
If you want to learn DOS, there is plenty of resources on the Web. Personally, I learned a lot with Computer Hope.

If you don't feel like learning DOS, here is an alternative: Droplets.
Droplets are batch files (.bat) on which you can drag-and-drop a file to be processed. It is a form or simple programing.

Here are a few examples.

Analyze an audio or video file for Loudness, Loudness range and True Peaks with FFmpeg.
Step 1: Download FFmpeg for your system and extract it to a location of your choice.
Step 2: Download FFmpeg Loudness Droplet.zip and extract it in the same folder where ffmpeg.exe is.
VoilĂ ! Now you can drag-and-drop a media file on the Droplet and you will see the analysis running, "spitting" data for each 100ms of audio and at the end you will see the desired statistical results.
If you want to have that function available in another folder or on the Desktop, create a shortcut to FFmpeg Loudness Droplet.bat in that location.

Get info about a audio and video files with Media Info.
NB: Media Info offers a GUI, which is more practical than a droplet, but if you don't want (or can't) install it, read further.
Step 1: Download MediaInfo CLI for your system and extract it to a location of your choice.
Step 2: Download MediaInfo Droplet.zip and extract it in the same folder where MediaInfo.exe is.
VoilĂ ! Now you can drag-and-drop a media file on the Droplet and you will see the Meta Data being listed.
If you want to have that function available in another folder or on the Desktop, create a shortcut to MediaInfor Droplet.bat in that location.

If you are looking for a MetaData tool for pictures, have a look at ExifTool by Phil Harvey.
You can make a Droplett simply by renaming exiftool.exe to exiftool(-k).exe. That's all!

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